The three basic methods of mixing dough

1. Straight Dough Method 
2. Modified Straight Dough Method (or Modified Mixing) 
3. Sponge Method 

1. Straight Dough Method: In its simplest form, the straight dough method consists of only one step: Combine all ingredients in the mixing bowl and mix. Many bakers make good quality products by using this procedure. However, there is the possibility that the yeast may not be evenly distributed in the dough. It is therefore safer to mix the yeast separately with a little of the water. 
– Soften the yeast in a little of the water. Ideal temperature is 110 F. 
– Combine the remaining ingredients, including the rest of the water, in the mixing bowl. Add the dissolved yeast, taking care not to let it come in contact with the salt. 
– Mix to a smooth, developed dough. 

2. Modified Straight Dough Method: For rich sweet doughs, the straight dough method is modified to ensure even distribution of fat and sugar. 
– Soften the yeast in part of the liquid, using a separate container. 
– Combine the fat, sugar, salt and flavorings and mix until well combined, but do not whip until light. 
– Add the eggs gradually, as fast as they are absorbed. 
– Add the liquid and mix briefly. 
– Add the flour and yeast. Mix to a smooth dough. 

3. Spong Method: Which allows yeast to speedily and fully ferment and activate with part of the flour and water in the recipe and later incorporated with the remainder of the ingredients. Some baker’s feel this method offers a better texture, rise and taste for very rich or heavy yeast dough recipes compared to the Straight Dough Method. Sponge doughs are prepared in two stages. This procedure gives the yeast action a head start. 
– Combine the liquid, the yeast, and part of the flour (and sometimes part of the sugar). Mix into a thick batter or soft dough. Let ferment until double in bulk. 
– Punch down and add the rest of the flour and the remaining ingredients. Mix to a uniform, smooth dough.

 

Sourdough starter

How To Make Your Own Sourdough Starter
Makes 4 cups

What You Need
Ingredients
All-purpose flour (or a mix of all-purpose and whole grain flour)
Water, preferably filtered

Equipment
2-quart glass or plastic container (not metal)
Scale (highly recommended) or measuring cups
Mixing spoon
Plastic wrap or container lid

Instructions
Making sourdough starter takes about 5 days. Each day you “feed” the starter with equal amounts of fresh flour and water. As the wild yeast grows stronger, the starter will become more frothy and sour-smelling. On average, this process takes about 5 days, but it can take longer depending on the conditions in your kitchen. As long as you see bubbles and sings of yeast activity, continue feeding it regularly. If you see zero signs of bubbles after three days, take a look at the Troubleshooting section below.

Day 1: Make the Initial Starter

4 ounces (1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
4 ounces (1/2 cup) water

Weigh the flour and water, and combine them in the container. Stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter. It will look like a sticky, thick dough. Scrape down the sides and loosely cover the container with plastic wrap or the lid (left ajar).

Put the container somewhere with a consistent room temperature of 70°F to 75°F (like the top of the refrigerator) and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 2: Feed the Starter

4 ounces (1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
4 ounces (1/2 cup) water

Take down your starter and give it a look. You may see a few small bubbles here and there. This is good! The bubbles mean that wild yeast have started making themselves at home in your starter. They will eat the sugars in the the flour and release carbon dioxide (the bubbles) and alcohol. They will also increase the acidity of the mixture, which helps fend off any bad bacterias. At this point, the starter should smell fresh, mildly sweet, and yeasty.

If you don’t see any bubbles yet, don’t panic — depending on the conditions in your kitchen, the average room temperature, and other factors, your starter might just be slow to get going.

Weigh the flour and water for today, and combine them in the container. Stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter. It will look like a sticky, thick dough. Scrape down the sides and loosely cover the container with plastic wrap or the lid (left ajar). Put the container somewhere with a consistent room temperature of 70°F to 75°F (like the top of the refrigerator) and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 3: Feed the Starter

4 ounces (1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
4 ounces (1/2 cup) water

Check your starter. By now, the surface of your starter should look dotted with bubbles and your starter should look visibly larger in volume. If you stir the starter, it will still feel thick and batter-like, but you’ll hear bubbles popping. It should also start smelling a little sour and musty.

Again, if your starter doesn’t look quite like mine in the photo, don’t worry. Give it a few more days. My starter happened to be particularly vigorous!

Weigh the flour and water for today, and combine them in the container. Stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter. It will look like a sticky, thick dough. Scrape down the sides and loosely cover the container with plastic wrap or the lid (left ajar). Put the container somewhere with a consistent room temperature of 70°F to 75°F (like the top of the refrigerator) and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 4: Feed the Starter

4 ounces (1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
4 ounces (1/2 cup) water

Check your starter. By now, the starter should be looking very bubbly with large and small bubbles, and it will have doubled in volume. If you stir the starter, it will feel looser than yesterday and honeycombed with bubbles. It should also be smelling quite sour and pungent. You can taste a little too! It should taste sour and somewhat vinegary.

When I made my starter here, I didn’t notice much visual change from Day 3 to Day 4, but could tell things had progress by the looseness of the starter and the sourness of the aroma.

Weigh the flour and water for today, and combine them in the container. Stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter. It will look like a sticky, thick dough. Scrape down the sides and loosely cover the container with plastic wrap or the lid (left ajar). Put the container somewhere with a consistent room temperature of 70°F to 75°F (like the top of the refrigerator) and let sit for 24 hours.

Day 5: Starter is Ready to Use

Check your starter. It should have doubled in bulk since yesterday. By now, the starter should also be looking very bubbly — even frothy. If you stir the starter, it will feel looser than yesterday and be completely webbed with bubbles. It should also be smelling quite sour and pungent. You can taste a little too! It should taste even more sour and vinegary.

If everything is looking, smelling, and tasting good, you can consider your starter ripe and ready to use! If your starter is lagging behind a bit, continue on with the Day 5 and Beyond instructions.

Day 5 and Beyond: Maintaining Your Starter

4 ounces (1/2 cup + 2 tablespoons) all-purpose flour
4 ounces (1/2 cup) water

Once your starter is ripe (or even if it’s not quite ripe yet), you no longer need to bulk it up. To maintain the starter, discard (or use) about half of the starter and then “feed” it with new flour and water: weigh the flour and water, and combine them in the container with the starter. Stir vigorously until combined into a smooth batter.

If you’re using the starter within the next few days, leave it out on the counter and continue discarding half and “feeding” it daily. If it will be longer before you use your starter, cover it tightly and place it in the fridge. Remember to take it out and feed it at least once a week — I also usually let the starter sit out overnight to give the yeast time to recuperate before putting it back in the fridge.

How to Reduce the Amount of Starter:

Maybe you don’t need all the starter we’ve made here on an ongoing basis. That’s fine! Discard half the starter as usual, but feed it with half the amount of flour and water. Continue until you have whatever amount of starter works for your baking habits.

How to Take a Long Break from Your Starter:

If you’re taking a break from baking, but want to keep your starter, you can do two things:

Make a Thick Starter: Feed your starter double the amount of flour to make a thicker dough-like starter. This thicker batter will maintain the yeast better over long periods of inactivity in the fridge.
Dry the Starter: Smear your starter on a Silpat and let it dry. Once completely dry, break it into flakes and store it in an airtight container. Dried sourdough can be stored for months. To re-start it, dissolve a 1/4 cup of the flakes in 4 ounces of water, and stir in 4 ounces of flour. Continue feeding the starter until it is active again. http://www.thekitchn.com/how-to-make-your-own-sourdough-starter-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-47337

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Reflective journal 5 (The self in the context of teamwork)

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For the past week with Parry we had memorable time. As individuals, we have different personalities, values and attitudes, skills and experience and whether we want to or not, it is in our human nature to perceive the world through our own set of lenses. Parry given us three websites to do the personality test, that was a wonderful chance to answer these three questions: who you really are? What can you do? What change will you need to make in the future?

My test result shows I am kind of person which extraverted, intuitive, thinking, judging (ENTJ), this kind of personality often find themselves in occupations that require good analytical and planning skills. ENTJs build successful careers in the areas requiring considerable organizational skills and intellectual efforts, presenting a challenge, and calling for creativity. They are greatly represented in technological and management consulting companies among engineers and developers, and among high- and mid-rank managers. They are also able to realize their potential in start-ups where they often fulfill management positions or take responsibility for the whole project. Determines occupations and areas in which ENTJs find them most fulfilled and content, are most successful, and therefore are most represented in.

Actually, this test result were surprised me, before the test I had a little bit doubt, but it is explained who am I accurately, it is make sense, cause when I was journalist these personalities helped me a lot, as a journalist you can’t be shy, the work asks you have excellent communication skills with everyone, and sensitive with news, trust your intuitive, the important part is you have to be a thinker with judging. There was a story between me and my team can explain how I have contributed and participated, my editor given us a topic about food safe, there was a food factory used unsafe food additive in flour which can make flour more white and good look, but it is unhealthy. At the beginning, we have to teamwork with each other to make a plan, then, we trust our intuitive, we can’t just take things on face value, even the boss of the factory didn’t admit they did bad thing, but from thinking and judging, we know we have to dig around until we get facts, finally, we did good job from our dedicated and determined.

Since my family moved to Canada, I dedicated to be a professional baker. I think my personality also can help me to contribution to teams in the future. From test I just know that I am a realist in the most basic sense of the word. Not only because my thinking is based upon a clear view of how things actually are in the world around me but also because my ideas and strategies are structured around those unambiguous “down to earth” commonsense beliefs which sum up the obvious and undeniable in life. I have several strengths also can contribution to teams or bakery:

  • High self-confidence. I trust my abilities and do not hesitate to express my opinion. So when I baking with confidence, it is easier to make success.
  • Strategic thinkers. I have no difficulties making long-term plans and approaching problems from several different angles. Especially in bakery, whatever you are a baker or a owner of bakery, problem always happen, find solution to figure it out is so important.
  • Energetic. I enjoy leading people and putting plans in action. Energize and motivate my team members. When I baking, usually need to stand long time and washing and pick up heavy staff, it asks people energetic.
  •  Very efficient. I do not like inefficiency, irrationality and laziness, I always seeking to root out such behavior where I go. As a baker, you must be efficient, customers can not wait your prepared long time, when people waiting with hungry, their easily turn to angry, efficient not only meaning fast, also means organize and professional.

So, my conclusion is I can contribution my strengths to teams in the future, and make a positive change for my weakness.

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